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'Jurassic World' gets a fantastic first poster

Just in time for Comic-Con, Universal Studios has unleashed a beautiful new teaser poster for Colin Trevorrow’s Jurassic World. Mark Englert draws the San Diego Comic-Con exclusive poster featuring a velociraptor, one of the franchise’s most iconic creatures, atop one of the famed vehicles from Steven Spielberg’s original as the titular theme park is supposedly being […]


"If I don’t come home covered head to toe in fake blood then I haven’t done my job as a horror director." -Eli Roth

"If I don’t come home covered head to toe in fake blood then I haven’t done my job as a horror director." -Eli Roth

(Source: upsidedowney)

Best TV of 2014 So Far by Max Molinaro

There’s so much good TV. It’s actually insane how much good TV there’s been since January. We’re in July and just past the halfway point of 2014 and already the amount of incredible stuff out there is overwhelming, so here are some of my favorites of the year thus far.

  • Arrow (CW) – DC has always and continues to shine when it comes to the stuff they put out on television. Say what you will about their choices in film of late (I’m not a fan, but I have my fingers crossed for Affleck’s Batman), their TV universe is really something. Arrow’s second season concluded in May with the show being one of the most exciting and probably best action series on air. With a growing universe of superheroes and villains, including the introduction to Barry Allen’s The Flash, Deathstroke, The Suicide Squad, Solomon Grundy, Black Canary, Brother Blood, and a host of others, Arrow is a really joy for comic book fans (like yours truly).  

  • The Americans (FX) – Season two of The Americans was darker and more morally ambiguous right from the very start. Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as Elizabeth and Philip Jennings, respectively, Russian sleeper spies living in America, face an unknown threat that put their lives and the lives of their own children in jeopardy. Smart and tightly scripted, The Americans is a show that deserves you attention.   

  • Louie (FX) – Louis C.K. has established himself as not only a brilliant comedian with Louie, but also an exceptional filmmaker. With humor that is often very dark, often pessimistic, and totally abstract (very much my kind of thing), Louie is one of the smartest and most interesting comedies to ever grace the small screen. Louie the character is routinely crapped on by life and struggles with love and family in this season. A special 90-minute episode flashbacking to an event in Louie’s childhood was a standout and clearly must’ve been based on something that really happened to the man, because it was one of the most honest and real feeling hour and a half of television I’ve ever seen. 

  • Silicon Valley (HBO) – Mike Judge’s new HBO comedy is hysterical. This satire in vein of Judge’s Office Space is funny from beginning to end. Almost every line sticks and I suspect that the whole cast will go on to have big careers. And best dick joke ever.

  • Mad Men (AMC) – The story of Don Draper has always been one of the best shows on TV, but after season six’s wheel-spinning, the first half of season seven was back to the high standards we’ve always expected from Mad Men. The new season had Don in a completely different position in his professional and personal life for the first time in a good long while. Jon Hamm, Elisabeth Moss, John Slattery, Vincent Kartheiser, Christina Hendricks, and Robert Morse continue to amaze as Mad Men starts to move to its endgame.

  • Parks and Recreation (NBC) – What started off as something some may have perceived to be an Office clone has evolved into being TV’s sweetest and heartfelt comedy. With no weak link in the cast, led by the terrific Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope, season six of Parks & Rec was magnificent. The season took every character into new directions and progressed the entire parks department forward in a big way. Always funny and with a surprising finale that may have been the best episode of the show so far, Parks and Recreation is what all network comedies should aspire to be.  

  • Penny Dreadful (Showtime) – In a year where the name Frankenstein was almost forever ruined in the atrocious I, Frankenstein, the horror icon has been saved with John Logan’s gothic horror show starring, Josh Hartnett, Eva Green, Timothy Dalton, Billie Piper, Reeve Carney, and Harry Treadaway. A slow-burn, atmospheric, show, Penny Dreadful combines several characters of classic horror literature and completely original ones, as a group of conflicted souls hunt the creatures stalking the shadow’s of nineteenth century England. With multiple subplots running congruently at their own pace, the most compelling is Dr. Victor Frankenstein and his Monster’s. The Doctor is as obsessed with creating life as he’s always been, but Treadaway is excellent as the sympathetic and lonely man. The Creature is also a lonely creation and intelligent as he was in the original novel. He goes by the name Caliban, after the Shakespeare character, and hates what Frankenstein has made him. The doctor is the only thing his hates more than himself and he is sometimes truly scary as he threatens Victor’s very life unless he is given a bride. His several long monologues throughout the first season are a thing of beauty as they give him so many layers and often reflect the journeys of many other of the show’s characters, who are all lost in their own way. As much as I love the Frankenstein story, the absolute best aspect about the show is Eva Green as Vanessa Ives, a perplexing, sophisticated on the surface, and powerful woman. Green puts everything she has in her performance and this is the best she’s ever been in anything, which is saying a lot, given that she is amazing. She is frequently possessed by an unknown entity and the physicality she brings to the role is astounding. Penny Dreadful is a standout in a world now inhabited my many great horror shows.  

  • Fargo (FX) – You probably heard that they were turning the Coen Brothers’ classic into a TV show and you probably scoffed, spouted some pretentious stuff about how they should just leave the film alone, and there was no way it would work. I may have said some things to that extent, but we were all very wrong, Starring Billy Bob Thornton, Martin Freeman, Colin Hanks, Bob Odenkirk, and Allison Tolman, Fargo is amazing. An anthology series like True Detective and American Horror Story, Fargo is a complete story with a beginning, middle, and end. Thornton is menacing in a role reminiscent of Javier Bardem’s Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men. Freeman is great as an average joe turned conniving monster. The real surprise of the show is Allison Tolman, who has never had a big acting job besides a few episodes of a couple of other shows. She is the one smart cop in this small town, a fighter, and the only one that can comprehend the real scope of what’s going on. Fargo is an amazing crime thriller, with some dark comedy peppered throughout, which is totally unpredictable and incredible.   

  • True Detective (HBO) – A masterpiece. That is the only way to describe True Detective, HBO’s first season of it’s new anthology, created and written by Nic Pizzolatto. All eight episodes are written by Pizzolatto and directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, giving it a sense of unity and creating the feeling that True Detective is really just an 8-hour film. Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson as the two leads are the best they’ve ever been. McConaughey is a dark, tortured, and nihilistic man, often expressing his distaste for humanity as a whole and the futileness of it all. Harrelson is actually the straight man of the two, which is unusual given his past works. He is the more “normal” of the two, but he still has many of his own personal issues with anger, an unhappy home life, extramarital affairs, and bouts of alcohol abuse. The arc for both characters over the course of just eight episodes is unbelievable and without a doubt will be a shining example on how to write interesting characters. The mystery at the heart of the show is a journey into the heart of darkness as the two leads (often unreliable narrators as what they say is not what we’re actually seeing) recant the story of the case that almost destroyed them and has now resurfaced. With a constant sense of dread, much like the feelings creating by Robert W. Chambers’ The Yellow King and the stories of H.P. Lovecraft, True Detective is one best seasons of television ever.

  • Game of Thrones(HBO) – We all watch Game of Thrones. We all love Game of Thrones. Season four was the best season yet. I’ve already written in depth about it here, so check out my “Best Moments of Season Four”.

  • Hannibal(NBC) – I love True Detective, Game of Thrones, Fargo, Mad Men and many of the other great shows on now, but Bryan Fuller’s Hannibal is my favorite. Only two seasons in and I’m comfortable saying that it is one of my favorite shows of all time. The darkest story and character-wise and a by far the most beautiful in terms if visuals, Hannibal is an achievement. Before the show began I couldn’t imagine anyone other than Anthony Hopkins successfully playing Hannibal Lector, but Mads Mikkelsen is just as good. He is a master manipulator and you could write a whole book on his motives and the way he interacts with others. The show is called Hannibal, but this Hugh Dancy as Will Graham’s story. Will goes down one the darkest arcs ever seen on TV, as he is the only person that knows the kind of monster Hannibal really is and the strain it puts on his fragile psyche. He is tested as he and Hannibal play one of the deadliest games of cat and mouse ever. The friendship between the two is worthy of an entire essay. They both get something out of the twisted friendship and they both always know something the other doesn’t. It is utterly engrossing. Laurence Fishburne as Jack Crawford is also very noteworthy as a man pulled between Will and Hannibal. He is conflicted and tries to be the anchor for everyone as his world is falling apart all round him. Caroline Dhavernas, Raúl Esparza, Gillian Anderson, Hettienne Park, Michael Pitt, and Katharine Isabelle all fill out the rest of the cast, coming in and out of the season at various points and each bringing something new and unique out of Will and Hannibal. I mentioned the visuals earlier and will mention them again because this show is gorgeous. It is possibly the most wonderfully shot and designed show ever, with every shot being carefully constructed and every color, set, prop, and dreamlike imagery having some sort of deeper meaning just waiting to be analyzed by the audience. It is also remarkably violent and so disgusting sometimes that it even manages to make me cringe (if you know me at all, then you know that making me wince is a feat). I don’t get how this show that isn’t on HBO, Showtime, or Starz gets away with some of the stuff that Hannibal gets away with, but I so happy that it does. The season finale was also something special and after much thought, I’m going to say it is my favorite season finale of any show in recent memory. Hannibal is the best thing on TV now and if you’re not watching, then you should be. Season three can’t come soon enough.           

Other Great Shows of 2014

  • Orange is the New Black(Netflix)
  • House of Cards(Netflix)
  • American Horror Story: Coven (FX)
  • Brooklyn Nine-Nine(Fox)

Something Personal I Would Like to Mention

  • Californication(Showtime) – In 2007 I was a sophomore in high school and I heard David Duchovny was going to be starring in a new show on Showtime. Of course I was going to watch since The X-files is my favorite show of all time next to Breaking Bad. That’s how I found Californication, the sex and booze fueled dramatic comedy set in LA about the womanizing writer Hank Moody. My young teenage self loved it. Though it eventually became a shell of what it once was, I stuck with it because I liked Hank, despite all his douchebaggery. It came to an end this summer after seven seasons of whiskey, drugs, and sex. It was one of the few remaining shows that began airing and I started watching in high school that lasted with me all the way through college (Mad Men, Parks & Rec, and It’s Always Sunny are all that remain). It was a guilty pleasure, but it was a constant for me. Through all the “fucking and punching” and the maybe less interesting later seasons, I liked Californication and I’ll miss the adventures of Hank Moody.

Shows Coming Up or Just Starting

  • Masters of Sex season 2
  • The Leftovers
  • The Strain
  • Married
  • The Flash
  • Gotham
  • Constantine
  • iZombie 

‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ is Incredible by Max Molinaro

After laying dormant for decades, one of science fictions most iconic franchises, The Planet of the Apes, was revived and at the same time quickly killed by Tim Burton and his wretched remake back in 2001. That’s why in the summer of 2011 Rise of the Planet of the Apes was such a delightful surprise. Now Planet of the Apes is officially back to being the high quality franchise it deserves to be with Matt Reeves’ Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, quite possibly the best in the franchise to date and one of the best films of the year. Set ten years after the manmade virus wiped out most of humanity, Caesar (Andy Serkis), the hyper intelligent chimp of Rise, leads a growing community of apes in the vast forests of California. Caesar has a wife and two sons and all seems well with the world of the highly evolved simians. Their peace is threatened when they discover a group of humans looking to repair the nearby dam and restore power to the dilapidated San Francisco. While Caesar and Malcolm (Jason Clarke), a human with a family of his own, try to forge an alliance, there are characters on both sides, human and ape, that are uneasy and doubt that there can ever be real peace between the two, which may just very well be the case.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is an astounding, character driven, post-apocalyptic science fiction film that is both intelligent and exciting. Dawn is one of the most bold big studio pictures in a long time. The apes get more screen time than the humans, which is just fine because they are just as interesting and fleshed out as any human characters would be. Caesar is the star of the film and Andy Serkis continues to bring tremendous depth to his motion capture characters. Caesar was raised by kind-hearted humans and has reason to believe there can be peace, but protecting his family is always his main objective. He is conflicted and torn between two worlds and it shows in Serkis’ incredible performance. Just as good as Serkis, is Toby Kebbell as Koba, Caesar’s right-hand man (ape) and a character that brings the weight of being tortured as a lab rat by humans prior to the viral apocalypse. Caesar and Koba’s friendship and the increasing tension between them is one of the most intriguing relationships in film all year. This is the apes’ film, but none of the human characters are wasted. Jason Clarke, like Caesar, is a good person who wants nothing but to protect the ones he cares for. Gary Oldman, playing Dreyfus, is the human leader and is less trust worthy of the apes and would do anything he has to protect what’s left of humanity. It’s tough to say if there are any real good or bad guys in the film, because really everyone is out to just survive. Yes, there is big action and grand spectacle, but the film never loses sight of the characters at the center of it all.

Loss is a major theme of the film as all the characters have lost something important to them. Caesar has lost the people that raised him. Malcolm has lost his wife. Malcolm’s son, Alex (Kodi Smit-McPhee), lost a mother. Keri Russell’s Ellie (Malcolm’s second wife whom he met years after the end of the world) has lost a daughter. Dreyfus lost his whole family. Koba’s has lost his ability to feel almost anything other than hate toward humanity. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is a dark film and rightfully so given the subject matter. It’s science fiction at it’s best with many interpretations that could relate to racism, war (more so war of recent history), and civil unrest.

Apart from being a heavy and extraordinarily smart sci-fi film, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is a technical marvel. The visual effects by Weta Digital (The Lord of the Rings, King Kong, and Avatar) are easily some of the best ever put to screen. Right from the very start you’ll ask yourself “how are these not real apes or men in suits?”. Michael Giacchino’s score is fantastic and often harkens back to the Jerry Goldsmith score of the original film. Then there is the highly detailed production design, which really sells the world of the film. Graffiti covered walls, plant life taking back San Francisco, and ape architecture all make this place feel lived in and real. It is amazing on all fronts.

Matt Reeves continues to get better with his film as Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is his best yet. The film doesn’t hold you hand and is often subtitled or in broken ape English, which in of itself should be commemorated in a big Hollywood film. It makes you believe that everyone behind this film was 100% confident in what they were making. Dawn is a remarkable film on every level, being both a sophisticated sci-fi thriller for adults and also a heart pumping summer blockbuster. It is one of the year’s best.  

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Things to Watch After Dawn

  1. The Planet of the Apes (1968)
  2. King Kong (1933)
  3. King Kong (2005)
  4. Snowpiercer
  5. Children of Men
  6. Stake Land
  7. Dredd
  8. The Road Warrior
  9. The Lord of the Rings trilogy
  10. Let Me In
  11. Lawless
  12. Godzilla (2014)
  13. Grimm Love
  14. Television’s The Americans on FX

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20 Great Horror Films You’ve Probably Never Seen – July 2014 Edition, by Max Molinaro

There are a lot of great horror films out in the world and there are plenty that not many people have seen. Because of that I’m going to start putting out a list of horror films that not many people have heard of in small batches from now till the end of time. This probably isn’t aimed at the diehard horror fans that’ve probably seen many of the films I’ll mention, but if you love horror films like I do, maybe you’ll catch something you may have missed. So, here’s my first 20 great horror films you’ve probably never seen. 

  • Martyrs (2008) – This is a rough one that’s may even be too much for some horror movie veterans, let alone folks new to the genre. Martyrs is a French movie directed by Pascal Laugier and stars Morjana Alaoui and Mylène Jampanoï. The film follows the two female leads as one seeks revenge for being kidnapped and tortured in her youth. She’s been psychologically damaged and has become ruthless in her pursuits. She is also racked with guilt about something she witnessed during her initial escape many years ago, which leads to some of the film’s most frightening sequences. It’s a brutal and in many ways nihilistic as it is part of the New French Extremity movement, where you’ll find a smorgasbord of hyper violent cinema. If you can get past the darkness and the violence, you’ll see that there is more to the film than meets the eye and there are many ways to interpret its message.     

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  • Ginger Snaps (2000) - John Fawcett’s Canadian teen horror film follows Brigitte (Emily Perkins) and Ginger Fitzgerald (Katharine Isabelle), two sisters with a morbid fascination for death. One night they are attacked by what was originally thought to be a rabid dog and Ginger is bit. She soon begins acting strange (and I mean strange for the Fitzgerald sisters, because they already had a reputation) and slowly begins to change physically. It is clear that she is becoming a werewolf and she begins to turn on her sister, the only person she has ever cared for. Ginger Snaps is one of my personal favorite werewolf movies, second only to the classic John Landis film An American Werewolf in London. This tragic tale is sometimes darkly funny, but is ultimately a story about girls entering womanhood. It’s an intelligent take on puberty through the guise of a werewolf movie.  

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  • From Beyond (1986) – “Humans are such easy prey”. From Stuart Gordon and much of the crew of Re-Animator comes From Beyond, the best H.P. Lovecraft adaptation to date. The film stars Jeffrey Combs (the Re-Animator himself), Barbara Crampton, Ken Foree, and Ted Sorel and is a gory body-horror film unlike anything you’ve seen before. When two scientists create a device that lets them see through reality to a metaphysical world, they mistakenly open a door that risks unleashing horrible beasts on the rest of the world. Their experiment turns into a disgusting nightmare that would make Lovecraft himself proud as the film reminds you “the most merciful thing in the world… is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far” (Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu).

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  • Eyes Without a Face (1960) – This French pseudo-slasher film, released the same year as Psycho, remains just as shocking today as it did all those decades ago. Directed by Georges Franju and starring Pierre Brasseur and Alida Valli, the film follows a mad doctor as he kidnaps and murders women in order to remove their faces and transplant them on to his disfigured daughter. In many ways the film is as grotesquely beautiful as it is disturbing and continues to be highly influential across the globe. 

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  • Stake Land (2010) – Director Jim Mickle’s second feature is an ultra low budget that combines vampire and zombie apocalypse stories in some incredibly unique ways. Starring Nick Damici, Connor Paolo, Danielle Harris, and Kelly McGillis, Stake Land follows survivors of a vampire apocalypse as they do everything in their power just to survive. Damici plays a bit of a badass vampire slayer, while Paolo is just learning the ropes. Both scary and sad, Stake Land is a character driven indie that is a must. 

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  • We Are What We Are (2013) – Jim Mickle’s follow-up film to Stake Land was even better and proved that Mickle is a director to watch. A loose and superior remake of a 2010 Mexican film of the same, We Are What We Are is a film about family suffering from the loss of a mother. The father (Bill Sage), an old fashioned man, now must lay the burdens formally held by his wife on his two daughters (Ambyr Childers and Julia Garner) and those burdens are unlike that of any normal American family. Just like Stake Land, this ultra low budget horror drama is depressing, but you can’t look away as this family begins to buckle under the weight of their own traditions. Michael Parks also stars and he is always a welcomed presence.

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  • Trick ‘r Treat (2007) – I love Trick ‘r Treat so much. I now watch it every Halloween alongside John Carpenter’s classic Halloween. It’s that good. This horror anthology directed by Michael Dougherty and starring Dylan Baker, Brian Cox, and Anna Paquin is one of the most purely fun horror films to come out in the past decade. Featuring several short stories that are intertwined both in the editing and with characters, it has just about everything you could ask for and perfectly captures the spirit of the holiday.

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  • The Devil Rides Out (1968) – Though some effects and storytelling elements may be a tad dated for some, this little known Hammer Horror classic directed by Terence Fisher and starring Christopher Lee, Niké Arrighi, Charles Gray, Leon Greene, and Patrick Mower gets that all good horror films need to have a certain kind of atmosphere to be effective. This is classic battle of good versus evil and has Christopher Lee in a rare role of playing a hero instead of one of his many classic villainous roles.

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  • Splinter (2008) – Another dirt cheap monster movie, Splinter is directed by Toby Wilkins and stars Shea Whigham (on of those “you’d know him if you saw him” actors), Jill Wagner, and Paulo Costanzo. Whigham plays an escaped convict who becomes stuck in a secluded gas station with a young couple when a strange virus turns its hosts into a horrid creature. Similar to Carpenter’s The Thing is some respects, Splinter is a tightly paced, claustrophobic, and creepy monster movie and I love it.

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  • Kill List (2011) – Upcoming British director, Ben Wheatley, delivered a morbid look into the darkness of a man’s soul with his 2011 horror-thriller starring Neil Maskell, Michael Smiley, and MyAnna Buring. It follows two contract killers as one of them, a family man outside of work, becomes increasingly violent and spirals out of control. Like MartyrsKill List is a very dark film that can be interpreted in many different ways. The third act of the film is simply terrifying.

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  • Pontypool (2008) – Possibly the most original take on the zombie film in the past couple of years, this Canadian horror film directed by Bruce McDonald and starring Stephen McHattie, Lisa Houle, and Georgina Reilly is really something special. Set almost entirely in a radio station, radio announcer Grant Mazzy tries to understand the chaos going on outside just by listening to the incoherent reports he is receiving from his colleagues and from the horrible sounds he is hearing. Is there a riot? Is it zombies? What is causing all this violence outside and will the crew of this small radio station make it through the night alive? You’ll never guess what’s going to happen next in this highly intelligent horror film.

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  • Wrong Turn 2: Dead End (2007) – The original Wrong Turn was a serviceable slasher film about a couple of mutant hillbillies offing beautiful people in the middle of the woods, but with this first sequel the franchise really stepped it up a notch and a couple of notches more after that. Directed by Joe Lynch, the film follows a group of contestants on a reality TV game show set in the wilderness, but of course the woods are home to a family of inbred mutant cannibals. This is a movie that’s for the gorehounds out there. Right from form the get-go the film pulls no punches and features grisly deaths throughout.

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  • Santa Sangre (1989) – This might be the one that may be just too much for some casual filmgoers. Directed by one of cinema’s all time greats, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Santa Sangre is an abstract work of very surreal art. Though there is more a clear cut narrative that some of Jodorowsky’s other works like Holy Mountain (which I absolutely LOVE, but I can see why it might by an acquired taste), Santa Sangre cans still be described as very avant-garde. Starring Axel Jodorowsky, Adan Jodorowsky, Blanca Guerra, Guy Stockwell, and Thelma Tixou, Santa Sangre is not a film with a plot that I could succinctly describe. It is a film that has to experienced because it really is art and pure as art can come. Jodorowsky is really just a brilliant madman.

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  • The Bay (2011) – This is a found footage horror film directed by Barry Levinson. Yeah, that Barry Levinson who directed Diner, The Natural, Rain Man, and Wag the DogThe Bay is Levinson trying something outside his comfort zone and that is reason enough for one to give it a try, but it helps that it is a really well done film. Based on the horrifying real life parasite known as Cymothoa exigua, The Bay is a story about a fictional town being almost completely wiped out in the course of a day by the wretched little tongue eaters. Disgusting and genuinely creepy, The Bay is really successful little film from a director doing something outside his wheelhouse. 

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  • The Loved Ones (2009) - Directed by Sean Byrne and starring Xavier Samuel and Robin McLeavy, The Loved One is a violent Australian film that’s not for the faint of heart. A teen is kidnapped and tortured by a crazed young woman and her father as they hold a mock prom in their isolated home. Just when you think things can’t get any worse for Brent (Samuel) they of course get far more terrible. The relationship between the murderous duo is a fascinating one as you slowly learn more and more about them as the film goes on. You’ll never want to go to a school dance again after this.  

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  • City of the Living Dead (1980) – Directed by the “godfather of gore” Lucio Fulci, this Italian film is fun, gory, atmospheric, and stylish. It kicked off Fulci’s unofficial Gates of Hell trilogy, where the other two films will probably be included in later editions of this series of articles. It’s a bit silly at times, but it’s a fun zombie film that could only be made in the time and country that it was made. Some good Lovecraft references peppered in throughout are a nice touch.

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  • F (aka The Expelled) (2010) – I suspect that this is the least know film on this list and it’s a shame because this is a damn good British horror film. Directed by Johannes Roberts and starring David Schofield, the film follows a high school teacher who is getting dumped on from almost every direction. His day only gets worse when he gets into a conflict with his daughter that might cost him his family and is job. Those problems soon take second fiddle to something even worse as Schofield begins to be tormented by several hooded kids. Eventually the faceless hoodlums become violent and begin murdering the few people who have remained at the school several hours into the night after the school day has ended. This is a dark, tightly paced, well directed, and well-acted film that I highly recommend you seek out. It also features a really haunting and fantastic musical score.  

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  • Who Can Kill a Child? (1976)– This Spanish horror film directed by Narciso Ibáñez Serrador follows an English couple (played by Lewis Fiander and Prunella Ransome) on holiday. They arrive at their destination to find all the adults missing and the island’s children stalking them. The kids turn violent and the couple must do whatever they can to survive. Adding to the peril, the wife is pregnant, which just makes their quest to survive all the more desperate. This is a harrowing film as you can imagine by the title, and by the end you may have an answer to the question it asks.

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  • Frozen (2010) – Let’s get this out of the way first: I’m not talking about that wonderful Disney film, I’m talking about Hatchet director’s Frozen, so we should just let it go (wink). It’s just a coincidence that this is the third single location horror film on this list after Splinter and Pontypool, but it can be a wonderful challenge for low budget horror filmmaking, and it pays off in spades in Frozen. The premise is simple as it is a film about three friends played by Emma Bell, Shawn Ashmore, and Kevin Zegers as they are stuck on a ski lift after the ski lodge shuts down for the night. Their only option is to find a way down or freeze to death over the next week while the resort is closed. Their escape is hindered by the cold, height, and a pack of wolves waiting for some tasty human meat to come down and that is where the horror lies. It’s a film that’ll have you asking, “what would I do in this situation?” and “how quick would I start to turn on my friends?” This is a horror movie that relies on tension and sound design as opposed to gore and jump scares and shows Adam Green’s potential after doing the fun Hatchet films.

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  • The Burning (1981) – This is just pure 80s. Everything about this movie is just so much of that time. This is a quintessential 80s slasher film, which was just a knock-off of Friday the 13th (which in turn was riding the coattails of Halloween). Directed by Tony Maylam and featuring some gory makeup effects by famed special effects makeup artist Tom Savini, The Burning is just a blast of a film, with a memorable villain named Cropsy. Fun fact: a young Jason Alexander’s very first feature film role.   

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